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How the V8 engine works?

V8 is a JavaScript engine built at the google development center, in Germany. It is open source and written in C++. It is used for both client side (Google Chrome) and server side (node.js) JavaScript applications. V8 was first designed to increase the performance of the JavaScript execution inside web browsers. In order to obtain speed, V8 translates JavaScript code into more efficient machine code instead of using an interpreter. It compiles JavaScript code into...
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Relational database and Normalization

In relational database design, the goal of normalization is to check whether or not a relationship fills the prerequisites for a given normal form. This will automatically minimize redundancy and anomalies in insertion, deletion and update. There are 4 basics and commonly used normal forms : first (1NF), second (2NF), third (3NF) and Boyce-Codd (BCNF) normal forms. First Normal Form 1NF makes reference to the concept of atomicity : the table represents a relation in...
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Ruby: tips, tricks and bytecode analysis

Ruby is by definition a minimalist and natural language which, I think, is a very good thing for software development. It is also a dynamic, object oriented language but can also be used with multiple programming paradigms like imperative, functional or reflective. It was first written in C, as a single-pass interpreted language and was designed for “programmer productivity and fun”. What surprised me so far Coming from a C based programming language, some part...
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Generics in C#

One of the most important new feature of C# 2.0 (released in 2005) was the introduction of generics. Knowing how they are implemented is essential to understand key features they will bring later to C# and the .NET framework (technologies like LINQ for example). What are generics? Also called parametric polymorphism, generics consist in declaring a type with a type parameter that will be instantiated when it will be needed. It adds a great flexibility...
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Calculating service availability

MTBF, MTTD, MTTR and MTTF are the four parameters required to calculate the availability of a service or an individual component in a specific architecture. MTBF: Mean Time Between Faults MTTD: Mean Time To Detection MTTR: Mean Time To Repair MTTF: Mean Time To Failure Once we got this, we can calculate service availability with the following: MTBF = MTTD + MTTR + MTTF Availabiliy = MTBF / (MTBF + MTTR) Example: a component with...
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